Monthly Archives: August 2013

Harvest underway everywhere

swathed canola

Drive anywhere near Wilkie and you are sure to see swathed canola in the field waiting for the combine.

According to the latest Saskatchewan Crop Report, released by the Ministry of Agriculture August 29, harvest is underway everywhere in the province. Five per cent of crops had been combined and 14 per cent were swathed or ready to straight-cut. Although harvest operations are behind the five-year average for this time of year, yields are above average. The five-year average (2008-2012) is 15 per cent combined and 22 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

For our area specifically, the crop report says, regarding August 20 to 26:

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Two per cent of the crop has been combined, and 19 per cent has been swathed or is ready to straight cut. Thirty-nine per cent of winter wheat, 21 per cent of peas and 19 per cent of lentils have been combined. Forty-two per cent of canola has been swathed. Very little rain was recorded for the week, allowing producers to get a good start on harvest. Of the crop that has been harvested, crop reporters are indicating yields are above average for most areas of the region. Rain recorded ranged from nil to 10 mm (Biggar area). Soil conditions are very dry in the region as most areas have not had a significant amount of rain for a month or more.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 46 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 10 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 35 per cent adequate, 46 per cent short and 19 per cent very short. All crop districts in the region are reporting more than one third of the crop and hay land is short of topsoil moisture.

Very little crop damage was reported in the region. Dry conditions are causing the majority of crop stress. Producers are busy with harvest operations.

Leipzig Serenity Retreat

By Kathy Heilman

The staff of Leipzig Serenity Retreat opened up the doors August 18, to show off the finished rehabilitation of the former Leipzig Convent.

The convent was constructed in the early 1920s and served as a day and boarding school for Catholic boys and girls until 1969.

Over the years since then, many individuals and groups had ideas about what could be done with the beautiful 20,000 square foot building in a Saskatchewan prairie village which had since ceased to exist. It wasn’t until 2008 that the convent gained a new life.

A partnership of three people, originally from Alberta and Manitoba, had been wanting to help others become drug- and alcohol-free.

They bought the building and adjoining six acres and began many, many hours of hard labour, including repairing the 112 windows, repairing and replacing plaster, refinishing floors, upgrading electrical and plumbing thorugh the whole building, replacing the roof, putting in a new septic system, putting in a new water filtration system, building a gazebo, cleaning up the grounds and all this while continuing to work with clients suffering from addictions and ensuring the clients were given the necessary help to make them viable member of the community.

teapots and an antique buffer at Leipzig Serenity Retreat

The retreat owners have kept many antiques and other memorabilia and they welcome visits from former nuns, priests, students and others. If you would like to see this amazing facility, please call ahead to 306-658-4767.

The Leipzig Serenity Retreat has a staff of 12 with Ardyth Clark at the helm, a lady who doesn’t know the meaning of “It can’t be done!”  The retreat can now accomodate 16 clients at once, has a detox centre and most importantly can give those fighting addictions a quiet, relaxing and comforting place to achieve their goal of sobriety.

For photos from the open house August 18, please see the August 26 issue of the Press-Herald.

For more information about the drug and alcohol treatment programs offered at Leipzig Serenity Retreat, please visit http://leipzigserenityretreat.com/ or call (306) 658-4767.

 

 

 

 

Harvest has begun – Sask. Crop Report

swathing canola

Saskatchewan Agriculture’s crop report for August 13 to 19, says “warm weather with very little rain interruptions over the past week has helped speed crop development. Harvest operations have begun in many areas of the province.” The many areas include Wilkie as this photo was taken north of Wilkie, near Cloan, Aug. 20.

With reference to crop districts 6B and 7, West-Central Saskatchewan, the report reads as follows:

Warm weather has helped with crop maturity over the past several days. One per cent of peas have been combined in the region. Seven per cent of canola, three per cent of mustard, 12 per cent of peas and nine per cent of lentils have been swathed or are ready to straight cut.

Very little rain was recorded for the week ranging from nil to 7 mm (Perdue area). Most of the region has been missing the moisture that other areas have received over the past few weeks and soil conditions were very dry in some areas. Most crop reporters are indicating harvest operations are 10 days to two weeks behind normal compared to the last couple of years.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as one per cent surplus, 53 per cent adequate, 39 per cent short and seven per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as one per cent surplus, 44 per cent adequate, 42 per cent short and 13 per cent very short. All crop districts in the region are reporting at least one third of the crop and hay land is short of topsoil moisture.

Very little crop damage was reported in the region. Dry conditions and bertha armyworms are causing the majority of crop stress. Producers are busy getting ready for harvest.

Nominate an outstanding volunteer

Like many small towns, Wilkie each year recognizes a Citizen of the Year. Did you know that, for someone who truly does an exceptional job in serving the community, further recognition is available?

There are individuals in Wilkie and area who deserve to be nominated for the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal. Nominations are open until October 18. Here are the details as outlined in the government press release:

If you know an outstanding volunteer or someone who exemplifies exceptional community involvement, then please take the time between now and October 18 to nominate that individual for the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal.

“Our province is well known for our impressive volunteers,” Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield said.  “I encourage everyone to consider nominating a deserving individual to receive the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal, so that we can celebrate their tremendous contributions to our province.”

Any Canadian citizen who is a current or former long-term resident of Saskatchewan is eligible for nomination.  Nominations are not accepted for sitting members of Parliament, the Legislature or judiciary.  Groups or organizations cannot be nominated and posthumous nominations are not accepted.

The Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal is silver, circular in form and suspended by a V-shaped clasp from a ribbon of green and gold, the provincial colours.  It bears the Saskatchewan shield of arms with the Crown and the motto Nos ipsos dedimus (We Gave of Ourselves).  Recipients also receive a circular silver lapel pin displaying the Saskatchewan shield of arms superimposed on a “V,” a certificate and are entitled to use the post-nominal letters S.V.M.

Recipient names are also inscribed on a board adjacent to the Athabasca Gallery on the main floor of the Saskatchewan Legislative Building in Regina.

The medal is presented by the Lieutenant Governor during an annual ceremony.

Since its inception in 1995, 156 people have received the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal.  Additional information, nomination forms and a list of previous recipients can be found online at www.ops.gov.sk.ca/svm or call toll-free 1-877-427-5505.

Crop Report – Aug. 6 to 12

pea field

Bright-green peas in a field just north of Wilkie, Aug. 13 confirm the statement in the Saskatchewan Crop Report for the West-Central District that “Most crop reporters are indicating harvest operations are 10 days to two weeks behind normal compared to the last couple of years.”

Farmers are remindedthe Saskatchewan Crop Insurance deadline to select winterkill coverage for fall rye and winter wheat is Aug. 25.

The Crop Report for our area also said, “Most areas of the region recorded some rainfall for the week which will help crops on dry soil fill as harvest operations get underway. Most of the region has been missing the moisture that other areas have received over the past few weeks and soil conditions were very dry in some areas … Rainfall reported in the past week ranged from nil to 52 mm (Kindersley area). The highest cumulative rainfall in the region since April 1, 2013, has been recorded at Major, SK (352 mm).”

Fun Day at the pool

Brandon Fell

Lifeguard Brandon Fell was keeping his eyes open as the Wilkie Swimming Pool was full of kids laughing, swimming and playing games at the Fun Day hosted by the pool, Aug. 13.

Below are some pictures of Wilkie’s Balloon Man and one of his water-themed creations.

Please see the next Press-Herald, out Aug. 26, for more fun day photos.

Wilkie's balloon man drawing a face an octopus!

Saskatchewan Crop Report

hay bales, grain and canola

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture in its Crop Report August 8 said, province-wide, “Saskatchewan livestock producers have 90 per cent of the 2013 hay crop cut and 75 per cent baled or put into silage” while most “crops are podding and filling. There are reports of some crops starting to turn and desiccation of peas and lentils has just started in some areas of the southwest and west-central regions.”

Specific to west-central Saskatchewan, including Wilkie, “Livestock producers have 96 per cent of the hay crop cut and 82 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as eight per cent excellent, 88 per cent good and four per cent fair. Pasture conditions are rated as nine per cent excellent, 56 per cent good, 33 per cent fair and two per cent poor….Very little crop damage was reported in the region. Dry conditions and insects are causing the majority of crop stress.”

To read the whole Crop Report, click here:http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/crprpt130808