Author Archives: Helena

RCMP Reports for July 4 to 10

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for July 4 to 10, 2017

RCMP received a complaint of an individual intoxicated in a public place. Members located the subject of complaint and transported him to North Battleford cells until he was sober. The complainant declined to lay charges.

Police received a complaint of a vehicle hitting the railway crossing arms causing damage. This matter is still under investigation.

A 39-year-old male from Waskatenau, Alberta, and a 50-year-old female from Vermilion, Alberta, were charged with possession of property obtained by crime after police located an abandoned vehicle that had been stolen.

An individual turned in a safe to RCMP that he found in a ditch. The safe and its contents were returned to the owner.

Police received a report of an abandoned vehicle. Members spoke with the registered owner who agreed to move the vehicle.

RCMP attended a vehicle collision with a train at Wilkie. There were no injuries.  A traffic ticket was issued to the vehicle driver.

Members received a complaint of disturbing the peace. Complainant asked the subjects of complaint to leave and they caused no further issues. Police did not attend.

Police received a complaint of fail to remain at an accident scene. This matter is still under investigation.

There was also one false alarm.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

RCMP Reports for June 27 to July 3

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for June 27 to July 3, 2017

RCMP received a report of a power line down south of Wilkie on Highway 14. Members contacted SaskPower who advised they were aware of the situation and the lines are safe as they have been isolated.

Members received a report of impaired operation of a motor vehicle but it was unsubstantiated.

There was also one false alarm and one traffic complaint.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

RCMP Reports for June 20 to 26

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for June 20 to 26, 2017

RCMP received a report of a break and enter into a residence but it was unfounded.

Members attended the sudden death of a 49-year-old male from Wilkie, Sask. The death was not suspicious.

Police received a report of two vehicles trespassing on a rural property. Members did not locate the vehicles.

RCMP received a request from an individual to dispose of a firearm that he no longer wanted to possess.

Police issued a 60-day driving suspension to a 21-year-old male from North Battleford when he blew a warning during a traffic stop.

Members attended a two-vehicle collision on Highway 14 near Wilkie. There were no injuries and no charges were laid.

Members acted as mediators in a neighbour dispute.

A 52-year-old Wilkie male was charged with assault after members received a complaint of a domestic dispute.

There were also two false 911 calls and one false alarm.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

RCMP Reports for June 13 to 19

WILKIE REPORTS

Wilkie RCMP received a complaint of fraud.  Information sent to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

Police received a report of assault but the complainant declined to lay charges.

CP Police reported a small train derailment in the CP Rail yard.  Reported for information purposes.  Police did not attend.

Members received several reports of a malfunction with the railway crossing arms in Wilkie.

RCMP received a report of a dispute between two children.  Members attended but the parents of the two children were dealing with the incident.

Unity police attended a two vehicle collision on Highway 14 near the Scott turnoff.  The driver of one vehicle was transported to Wilkie Health Centre and then to Saskatoon Royal University Hospital by STARS Air Ambulance.  The driver of the other vehicle was not injured.  No charges were laid.

There was also one false alarm, one false 911 call and two traffic complaints.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

 Below, STARS helicopter on the helipad at Wilkie Health Centre:

stars @ wilkie

RCMP Reports for June 6 to 12

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for June 6 to 12, 2017

RCMP received a complaint of an individual selling marijuana but it was unfounded.

Members received a complaint of a hit-and-run causing damage to a vehicle. Reported for insurance purposes.

Police received a report of a pellet shot at a residence. This matter is still under investigation.

CP Police reported a vehicle hitting the railway crossing arms and causing damage. Members spoke with the subject of complaint. CP Police are dealing with the matter.

RCMP received a report of an individual failing to comply with an undertaking but it was unfounded.

Member spoke with an individual regarding child custody issues.

An individual contacted RCMP to inquire about a peace bond.

Police received a complaint of a suspicious vehicle but it was a member of the Citizens on Patrol Program patrolling the community.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

RCMP Reports for May 30 to June 5

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for May 30 to June 5, 2017

RCMP received a complaint of damaged water spouts at a residence. This matter is still under investigation.

Members assisted an individual whose truck was stuck in the ditch near Landis.

Police received a complaint of harassing communications. This matter is still under investigation.

Members spoke to an individual regarding child custody.

RCMP received a complaint of theft. This matter is still under investigation.

Police received a complaint of uttering threats but it was unfounded.

An individual complained of another individual posting court documents on Facebook. This matter is still under investigation.

Members are investigating a complaint of assault.

There was also one traffic complaint and one false alarm.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

RCMP Reports for May 23 to 29

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for May 23 to 29, 2017

RCMP received a complaint of a break-and-enter at a farmer’s shop. This matter is still under investigation.

Police received a complaint of a stolen fuel tank. There are no suspects at this time.

Members received a Mental Health Act complaint. The subject of complaint was located and left in the care of a family member.

Members attended the sudden death of a 39-year-old female from Wilkie, Saskatchewan. The death was not suspicious in nature.

CN Police reported a railway crossing malfunction at Reford SK. Reported for information purposes.

Police spoke with an individual who has been having disagreements with another person. No police action required.

RCMP received a request from the Crown prosecution office to locate and charge an individual in the area for breaching a probation order.

Members received a report of an injured animal north of Wilkie. Members attended but could not locate the animal.

Police received a report of a suspicious vehicle in a rural area. It was later discovered the vehicle driver was a photographer taking photos of the aurora borealis.

RCMP received a complaint of theft. This matter is still under investigation.

Members are investigating a report of criminal harassment.

Police received a complaint of assault with a weapon. This matter is still under investigation.

There was also one false alarm and one false 911 call.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

The price that they pay

The following is a speech written and delivered by Bryan Legrow, a retired firefighter with the Wilkie & District Fire/Rescue Department, and delivered at a firefighters’ appreciation banquet held at Wilkie, Saskatchewan, June 2, 2017.

Good evening, everyone and distinguished guest. For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Bryan Legrow. I called Wilkie home for just over 23 years. Twenty of those years I was a member of the Wilkie Fire/Rescue Department. I recently retired from the department as my wife, Wendy, and I moved to Saskatoon. It’s a little bittersweet that this is the last time I will ever be involved in a celebration like this with this fine group.

When Chief (Randy) Elder asked me a few weeks back if I would speak tonight about what it’s like to be a firefighter and what the service means to the community, I was deeply humbled and honoured to speak tonight. How do I explain to people what it’s like to be a firefighter for those who have never done it? Most people don’t really know what it is like to serve a community in this capacity and the responsibility that comes with it.

A fire department is made up of two types of capital. There is the bricks, mortar and equipment. This is the piece that is always in a state of debate at various levels of government around dollars, taxes, mill rates, budgets, etc. Then there is the human capital, the firefighters and their families. The spouses and families are a huge piece of the equation that this commitment requires from every firefighter, and that comes at a cost. This is very rarely debated at any level of government. There is no mill rate, tax or budget for this. How do you measure that human capital or attach a dollar figure? You simply can’t but trust me it does come at a cost.

A while back Kathy Heilman received the award for Wilkie & District Citizen of the year. In her speech she said, ”everyone has a price to pay for the space they occupy in their community, you just need to figure out what that price is.” I am not sure if her intent was to make those words as powerful as they were but they have stuck with me ever since.

”Everyone has a price to pay for the space they occupy in their community.” Think about that for a moment. Some people volunteer with many of the service groups in town. Some people are involved in minor sports. Some get involved with the schools or churches but the price those people pay by volunteering is no more or no less important to the people or the community.

Now look around the room at all the firefighters and their spouses that we are here to honour tonight. What do you think is the price they and their families pay?

I can’t even begin to count how many social gatherings, family functions, kids’ sporting and school events I have missed over the years, including all the members here tonight because they have missed them as well. So they can serve our community to keep it safe. That’s the price they pay.

I can’t count how many times I left the fire hall after being out all night. Went home to shower and went to work on no sleep. That’s the price they pay. That price has no dollar value but it comes at a cost to them, physically, mentally, professionally and personally.

Over my 20-year tenure as a firefighter I have seen a lot of great people come and go with the department. Some only for a few months and some with a lot of vested time in the department but, some of them I know left because that price became too high to continue to pay.

I don’t know how many people truly understand what it’s like to be a firefighter in rural Saskatchewan. It starts out for a lot of us living out a childhood dream of being a firefighter driving a big red truck. Then there is the passion for the industry, the comrade within the brotherhood as well as the adrenaline rush you get when you get a call.

Most people in our community have not had the experience of being sound asleep at 1 a.m. and by 1:15 a.m. being in full bunker gear with SCBA entering an engulfed structure. To try the best they can to save a neighbour’s home and belongings. Their children’s baby pictures, great grandma’s handmade quilt and all of their worldly processions. Then have to witness their emotional collapse when they realize everything they have ever worked for is now gone. That’s the price they pay.

Most people in our community will never know what it’s like to respond to the home of a friend, relative, neighbour and watch them pass away as CPR is being performed. All while trying to work within a chaotic scene, land a STARS chopper and not be able to do a damn thing about it as they watch them slip away. That’s the price they pay.

Most of the people in our community have never experienced what it’s like to be standing on a grid road in the middle of the night and extricate the body of a mother of two young children from a twisted wreck two days before Christmas. Then have to go home and look into the faces of their loved ones and pretend that everything is OK. That’s the price they pay.

While witnessing and working through all of this tragedy and carnage, it is generally happening under the microscope of onlookers, who you know will want to play armchair quarterback after everything is said and done and second-guess the decisions you made in a split second – to do what you believe was the right thing to do for the community and its residents. That’s the price they pay.

The role of the firefighter in Wilkie has changed dramatically in the last 20 years and will continue to change. They have gone from a perceived service club that some residents felt did nothing more than chase grass fires and save basements, to proving time and time again that they are a highly skilled, professional grade, well-oiled fire service machine who are able to respond and execute virtually flawlessly anything that is thrown at them. I know I have seen them do it. From an elderly lady who has accidentally set off her fire alarm, wildland fires, MVAs, train derailments, search and rescue, chemical spills, body recovery and the list goes on. They execute every time professionally and proficiently. I know; I’ve seen them do it.

The fire service industry itself is in a constant state of change not only for the professionals but also the volunteers. Equipment, apparatus, SOPs, communications, NFPA regulations and the list goes on and on. This is something our firefighters need to stay on top of because, when the time arises to exercise their skill sets, they are held to the same standard as the professionals. This is a piece that almost everyone outside the service doesn’t realize. Regardless who responds and how many members respond, the expectation of the community is that they know what they are doing and can perform any task and operate any piece of equipment to the same standard as the professionals.

This is a service the residents of this community and the area they serve should be very proud of as this group rivals the skills of any professional service in the province and I would say in some instances the pros could learn a lot from this group sitting here tonight. Let’s remember these people have full-time jobs and obligations. This is not their chosen profession. They are farmers, railroaders, tradesmen, business owners, facility managers and even the retired. Yet they serve the community like pros. Why? Because it is their passion and they believe it is their obligation to their community; and the commitment in keeping up with that change is their self-imposed duty for their friends, neighbours and relatives. That’s the price they pay.

This group of firefighters we are here to honour tonight are some of the finest committed individuals I have ever had the pleasure of meeting and serving with. I consider them friends. I would trust them with my life. I can say that with the utmost confidence because I have done it. These people put themselves selflessly in situations a normal person wouldn’t, only because they know that their brothers are competent enough to have their backs. When things go sideways or terribly wrong in the community, this is the group you want to have on scene and take charge.

When the community centre caught fire it was all hands on deck. No one hesitated or said I don’t want to do that. They all know what this facility means to the community. After the fire was extinguished, firefighters were huddled together next to one of the vehicles. Most physically spent, on their knees after doing several entries, dragging hoses, herding onlookers and trying to recoup. Do you know what they were talking about? Not how tired they were, how hungry or how thirsty they were. They weren’t talking about themselves. They were talking about the community and how are the kids, seniors and service clubs of the community going to cope with the loss of the facility. That speaks volumes to the type of people they are and their level of commitment to this community.

Ponder this and share with others in the community if you would like, when people begin to talk about how much it costs to have this service and why do they need all of this fancy equipment and training when that money should go into sidewalks, grading or culverts. What would happen if the community did not have this service? What if your son or daughter was involved in a MVA? Who would save them? Who would help you or your neighbours when a wildfire threatens their home, crop and livestock? If this service didn’t exist anymore in Wilkie, where would the help come from if it is not from here?

When most people who serve their community settle in for the evening and close their eyes, I am sure they see the smiles on the faces of people they helped and in their minds they are recounting those pleasant events of the day. When a firefighter finally lies down for the evening and closes their eyes after being out on a call, what do you think they see? It’s generally not smiles. It’s the faces of the distraught, injured, maimed and deceased. Some of which they will never forget for the rest of their lives.

The residents of the community and service area should take comfort in knowing that the Wilkie Fire/Rescue Department represents a group of individuals from all walks of life, age and backgrounds. But with one commonality. It’s a sense of community. They choose to pay for the space they occupy in their community by spending countless hours training, practicing and being on weekend call so that, when the situation arises, they are able to protect their neighbours, friends and relatives in this community.

So, what does it really mean to be a firefighter in Wilkie serving our community? It means commitment, sacrifice and adversity. No one does this for the accolades; they do it because it’s the right thing to do for the community. What dollar figure do you attach to that?

Firefighters – they deserve our respect and support as they have earned it. When they speak, people should listen as they know what they are talking about. When they respond to an incident, people shouldn’t second guess their actions because they have to live with them for the rest of their lives. Each and every one of them do this because ”everyone has a price to pay for the space they occupy in their community” and they have found that price. It is protecting the community and all of the residents within their service area and we all should be proud and thankful we have them.

In closing I would like to thank all of you for attending. Chief Elder for bestowing on me this great honour, I am truly humbled. To the firefighters and their families, don’t think for a second that what you do doesn’t matter in the community because it does.

I will leave you the words of the great Edward F Croker, a former Fire Chief from New York. ”When a man becomes a fireman his greatest act of bravery has been accomplished. What he does after that is all in the line of work.”

Stay safe and thank you.

Today’s paper

The June 16th issue of the Press-Herald is full of Wilkie news! Pick up a copy so you can read about and see:

  • a tribute dinner and retirement celebrations for Wilkie and District firefighters;
  • Norman Carter School’s track and field day;
  • some statistics from the Wilkie library and what they have planned coming up; and
  • an NSRBL update.

Fireworks photos too from last Friday’s Jump Into Summer/Canada 150 celebrations!

Wilkie SK

RCMP Reports for May 16 to 22

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for May 16 to 22, 2017

RCMP received a complaint of a suspicious person at a residence. Reported for information purposes.

Members discussed a peace bond with an individual.

Police received a complaint of an individual taking photographs of a residence. Members located the subject of complaint and issued a verbal warning.

RCMP received a complaint of theft but it was unfounded.

Police received a complaint of sexual assault. Members investigated and discovered the subjects of complaint are children under 12 and cannot be charged. Members referred the information to Child and Family Services.

Members received a complaint of individuals drinking alcohol and littering in Wilkie Regional Park. Members located the subjects of complaint and issued verbal warnings and requested the litter be picked up and disposed of properly.

RCMP received a complaint of uttering threats but it was unfounded.

There was a complaint of theft of fuel from a rural farmyard west of Wilkie. This matter is still under investigation.

Members received a report of a suspicious vehicle driving into a rural farmyard. The complainant later contacted his neighbor to warn of the vehicle and discovered it was a visitor of theirs who drove into the wrong yard.

Police received a child welfare Act complaint. This matter is still under investigation.

RCMP charged a 54-year-old Wilkie female with failure to comply with an undertaking during a conditions check.

There was also one traffic complaint.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.