Category Archives: Leipzig

RCMP Reports for August 8 to 14

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for August 8 to 14, 2017

RCMP received a request to remove an individual from Prairie Sky Recovery Centre at Leipzig, Sask. Members attended and transported the individual to a motel.

There was also one false 911 call and one traffic complaint.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

RCMP Reports for November 29 to December 5

WILKIE SK RCMP REPORTS for November 29 to December 5, 2016

RCMP responded to an individual in medical distress in Leipzig, Saskatchewan. Emergency Medical Services transported the individual to Wilkie hospital for assessment and the person was later transported to Saskatoon by STARS Air Ambulance. Another individual was transported to Kerrobert hospital for assessment. This matter is still under investigation.

Members transported an individual from Prairie Sky Recovery Centre to Wilkie hospital for assessment at the request of staff.

Police received a complaint of disturbing the peace. Members transported the subject of complaint to the bus depot in North Battleford.

RCMP received a report of a male running on Highway 14 near Wilkie. Members patrolled but the individual was gone on arrival.

A 63-year-old female from Battleford was charged with impaired operation of a motor vehicle during a traffic stop.

Persons with information about crimes being committed are urged to call the Unity RCMP detachment at 306-228-6300; the Wilkie RCMP at 306-843-3480; or the Macklin RCMP at 306-753-2171. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also call Saskatchewan Crime Stoppers at1-800-222-8477, or *8477 on the SaskTel Mobility Network. Crime Stoppers will pay up to $2,000 for information which leads to the arrest of person(s) responsible for any serious crime. Crime Stoppers is anonymous and does not subscribe to call display, nor are your calls traced or recorded.

You can also submit a tip online at www.saskcrimestoppers.com.

Ravens wrecking your grain bags? Now you can shoot them …

Earlier this month, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment amended The Wildlife Regulations, 1981 to allow landowners the ability to protect their property from ravens without requiring a permit.

Ravens have re-colonized agricultural Saskatchewan in recent years and populations are increasing. Cattle and grain producers have voiced concerns that ravens have been killing or injuring newborn livestock and damaging grain bags.

“Presently, landowners must obtain a permit from the ministry office to protect their property from ravens,” Environment Minister Ken Cheveldayoff said. “These amendments will remove the permitting requirement and add ravens to the list of species that may be killed by a landowner, occupant or designate in order to protect their property or livestock.”

“We support the actions the ministry is undertaking to assist landowners in managing problem ravens on their property,” Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities President David Marit said.

“The Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation (SWF) supports these amendments,” SWF Executive Director Darrell Crabbe said.  “We recognize that effective wildlife management requires science-based, active management on both game and predator species to provide additional licensed opportunities for hunters to harvest animals whose numbers are creating serious wildlife and livestock issues.”

Next week’s Press-Herald newspaper

Plenty in the paper again next week, starting off with an important article about the shortage of EMTs in the area, particularly in Wilkie, SK. You will also find an ad for people interested in training as first responders and EMTs – Heartland Health Region will assist with the costs.

You will also find articles on:

  • the World Day of Prayer,
  • the McLurg High School Science Fair;
  • who’s playing at the third annual Leipzig Music Festival; and
  • of course, an update on the Outlaws’ progress through league and provincial playoffs

Combine that with info on upcoming events, job opportunities and sales and it’s well worth the $1 at the store, if you don’t have a subscription!

EMS

Next week`s paper

Now that the weather has warmed up, is it safe to look back at winter yet? Well next week’s Unity Wilkie Press-Herald does just that, but it also gives us an idea of what we could expect through the rest of March and what authorities are saying about the expected spring runoff.

Along with the weather story, Monday’s paper features:news about a grant received by the Leipzig Music Festival, the latest RCMP and Outlaws reports and lots of positive news about the youth in our community. Some high school students are wrestling this weekend in provincials at Saskatoon while the girls’ basketball team is playing at regionals in Kenaston. Results from high school curling as well as involvement in the Saskatchewan Winter Games are also covered.

As always, even the ads provide interesting reading covering such things as land for sale, notices of upcoming annual general meetings, information about investment seminars, thank you ads and job opportunities.

Training programs for “the hired hand”

NEW AGRICULTURAL OPERATOR PROGRAM LAUNCHED IN SASKATCHEWAN

Hands-on training to help address farm labour challenges

The Agricultural Operator Program is a module-based program offering practical, hands-on training to individuals interested in working on Saskatchewan farms. Students and employers will have the flexibility to choose the entire program or specific modules relevant to their farms.

The first three modules will be seeding, spraying and scouting, and harvest to be delivered at Parkland Regional College in Yorkton. Additional modules will be developed for the livestock industry including haying, beef cattle reproduction and calving, and cattle husbandry and handling. Following the pilot program, the provincial government will work to expand the program to other regional colleges across Saskatchewan.

The pilot program will start with a seeding module beginning March 3 and ending April 16. The module is comprised of 36 hours of hands-on workshops and nine hours of online delivery. It will cover essential farm knowledge for seeding processes and equipment maintenance. The spraying module will be available in late May and the harvest module will be available in early July.

“We are pleased to run the pilot year of this course at our Yorkton Campus,” Parkland College President Fay Myers said. “The timing of the modules matches the critical times on the farm, so employees can take the seeding module during the time right before seeding. Then they can then put their education to use right away in the field.”

For more information on how to apply for the program, go to www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/GrowingForward2 or www.parklandcollege.sk.ca.

When the program was announced this week, Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart said, “Producers have indicated that they need more skilled labour for their operations and this program directly responds to their needs. Farmers can send current or potential employees through the program to develop or help fine tune their skills. Additionally, general labourers without a farm background will have an opportunity to gain the experience needed to get involved in the industry.”

spring in Saskatchewan

The federal and provincial governments will invest $200,000 in funding for the development and delivery of the Agricultural Operator Program pilot through Growing Forward 2.

Waste Reduction Week coming up

Environment Minister Ken Cheveldayoff has proclaimed October 21-27 as Waste Reduction Week in Saskatchewan, marking the 13th time the province has joined the nation in recognizing the week.

With an emphasis on engaging Canadians, Waste Reduction Week aims to inspire communities throughout the province and across the country to take a more conscientious approach toward the protection, preservation and enhancement of our environment.

“Saskatchewan has some of the most effective and successful recycling programs in the country,” Cheveldayoff said.  “Thanks to our recycling programs for used beverage containers, oil, tires, paint and electronics, more than 48,000 tonnes and 19 million litres of waste materials were diverted from our landfills in 2012.  However, there is still more to do when it comes to reducing waste and increasing recycling habits.”

“Too Good to Waste”, the theme for Waste Reduction Week, aligns with the government’s growth plan to sustain economic growth while protecting the environment and maintaining Saskatchewan’s excellent quality of life.

“We’re thrilled that the Ministry of Environment has proclaimed Waste Reduction Week,” Saskatchewan Waste Reduction Council Executive Director Joanne Fedyk said.  “Waste Reduction Week is a great opportunity to celebrate our accomplishments and to adopt new waste-reducing habits so that we can work toward a waste-free Saskatchewan.”

Waste Reduction Week in Saskatchewan is organized by the Saskatchewan Waste Reduction Council.  For more information, visit www.saskwastereduction.ca.

Harvest results

SaskAg Crop Report for West-Central Saskatchewan, Oct. 1 – 7

Harvest is essentially complete in the region: 97 per cent of the crop is combined. The five-year average (2008 to 2012) is 83 per cent combined. The amount of rainfall in the region last week ranged from nil to 36 mm (Dinsmore area). Sixty-seven per cent of the flax and 69 per cent of the canaryseed (two minor crops) have been combined. Yields well above the 10-year average are being reported.

Spring wheat grades are rated as 79 per cent 1CW, 17 per cent 2CW and four per cent 3CW.

Although some areas received rain last week, topsoil moisture conditions are still very dry. Twenty per cent of the crop land has adequate topsoil moisture, 50 per cent is short and 30 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 28 per cent adequate, 45 per cent short and 27 per cent very short.  Many areas in the region have not had a significant rainfall in over a month and a half. In crop districts 7A and 7B, over 43 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture is very short of topsoil moisture.

Producers are busy with fall weed control operations, hauling bales and bringing cattle home from pastures.

Above average yields in most of province

Of the crop that has been harvested, average to above-average yields are being reported in most areas. Spring wheat average yields are reported as 47 bushels per acre, durum 44 bushels per acre, barley 69 bushels per acre, canola 38 bushels per acre and peas 43 bushels per acre. Average yields vary from region to region, depending on seeding conditions and growing season moisture.  Provincial spring wheat quality is estimated to be above average. Grades for spring wheat are estimated as 59 per cent 1CW, 31 per cent 2CW, nine per cent 3CW and one per cent CW feed.

Crop progress before the rain

With our area escaping the rain experienced during the September 24 to 30 period covered by the latest Crop Report from Saskatchewan Agriculture, we continued to be ahead of the rest of the province in harvest progress.

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

The west-central region is the most advanced area of the province,  with 95 per cent of the crop combined and four per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut. Crop districts 7A and 7B recorded very little rain and so combines continued to roll in those areas. Rain ranged from nil to 62 mm (Hanley area). Spring wheat combined ranges from 90 to 100 per cent; oats 50 to 100 per cent; barley 40 100 per cent; canola 80 to 100 per cent and flax 10 to 100 per cent combined. Flax and canaryseed crops are being combined. Many farmers have completed harvest and others hope to finish within the week.

With some areas receiving very little rain, topsoil moisture conditions continue to deteriorate and are rated as 16 per cent adequate, 37 per cent short and 47 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 22 per cent adequate, 30 per cent short and 48 per cent very short. Many areas in the region have not received a significant rainfall in over a month. Crop districts 7A and 7B are reporting over 40 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture is very short of topsoil moisture. Crop and combine fires have been reported in many areas.

Pasture conditions are rated as three per cent excellent, 13 per cent good, 43 per cent fair, 28 per cent poor and 13 per cent very poor.

The majority of the crop damage was caused by strong winds (of up to 80 km per /hour) that damaged some swathed crops. Producers are busy finishing harvest, working fields and starting fall weed control.

Provincially

Seventy-nine per cent of the 2013 crop is now combined, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report. Significant rainfall recorded last week slowed harvest progress in most areas of the province. Fifteen per cent is swathed or is ready to straight-cut. The five-year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 74 per cent combined and 18 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Harvest progress is most advanced in the west-central region, where 95 per cent of the crop is combined. Seventy-two per cent is combined in the southeast; 85 per cent in the southwest; 68 per cent in the east-central region; 74 per cent in the northeast and 88 per cent in the northwest.

Rainfall throughout the province ranged from nil to 81 mm. Many areas received over 35 mm of rain, and heavy precipitation was reported in the southwestern, east-central and northeastern regions. Many areas in the southwestern, southeastern and east-central regions have been experiencing rain delays for a couple of weeks.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 65 per cent adequate, 19 per cent short and 11 per cent very short. Topsoil moisture on hay and pasture land is rated as two per cent surplus, 63 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and 11 per cent very short.

Pasture conditions are rated as nine per cent excellent, 43 per cent good, 29 per cent fair, 16 per cent poor and three per cent very poor.

Rain and strong winds caused the majority of the crop damage. The rain has resulted in bleaching and sprouting of some cereal crops. Wind has caused some shattering losses in swathed canola and ripe crops.

Farmers are busy combining, hauling bales and completing fall weed control operations.

 

Harvest progress most advanced in West Central Sask.

Crop Report for the Period September 17 to 23, 2013

Harvest is progressing well despite recent rains in many areas of the province.  Saskatchewan farmers now have 71 per cent of the 2013 crop combined, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.

Twenty-one per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut.  The five-year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 60 per cent combined and 23 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Harvest progress is most advanced in the west-central region, with 86 per cent of the crop combined.  Sixty-two per cent is combined in the southeast; 79 per cent in the southwest; 60 per cent in the east-central region; 68 per cent in the northeast and 73 per cent in the northwest.

Of the crop that has been harvested, average to above-average yields are being reported in most areas, however they vary from region to region.  Spring wheat average yields are reported as 46 bushels per acre, durum 44 bushels per acre, barley 68 bushels per acre, canola 38 bushels per acre, and peas 43 bushels per acre.

harvest skies

If you look carefully, you can see a second rainbow in this photo of a stubble field in Saskatchewan, Canada, taken September 23, 2013.

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

The west-central region is the most advanced area of the province with 86 per cent of the crop combined and 10 per cent swathed or ready to straight cut.  The five year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 56 per cent combined.  Crop district 7A has 91 per cent combined, 6B 83 per cent combined and 7B has 84 per cent of the crop combined.  Little to no rain was received last week, helping farmers stay in the field.

Estimated yield ranges for the region are reported as follows: winter wheat 30 to 50 bu/ac, spring wheat 30 to 60 bu/ac, durum 37 to 60 bu/ac, oats 65 to 100 bu/ac, barley 50 to 80 bu/ac, fall rye 30 to 40 bu/ac, flax 25 to 35 bu/ac, canola 30 to 48 bu/ac, mustard 1000 to 2000 lb./ac, lentils 1200 to 2400 lb./ac, peas 30 to 60 bu/ac and canary seed 750 to 1500 lb./ac.  Overall, quality is good and many farmers are expecting to wrap up harvest in the next week or two.

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to deteriorate and are rated as 13 per cent adequate, 49 per cent short and 38 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 14 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 42 per cent very short.  The region has not received significant rainfall in over a month and all crop districts are reporting that almost half of acres are short of topsoil moisture.

Crop and combine fires have been reported in many areas.

Producers are busy finishing harvest operations, working fields and starting fall weed control.